Mechanobiology Down Under

Research Updates
The inaugural Mechanobiology Down Under meeting was recently held at the Bronte Surf Lifesaving Club in Sydney on 3–4 May 2018.

Amongst high-calibre presentations by world leaders and experts in the mechanobiology field, the latest research from collaborations with HRI were presented. Dr Peter Qian Su from the Institute for Biomedical Materials & Devices, UTS presented on the super resolution microscopy technology being developed by HRI and UTS, the first of its kind for cardiovascular diseases in Australia.

HRI visiting scholar Ms Jiexi Liao from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA presented a novel mechanism on mechanical regulation of blood clotting discovered using biomembrane force probe technology, another key collaboration for HRI. “Receiving positive feedback from our peers in the mechanobiology community was very rewarding,” says Dr Arnold Lining Ju, lead scientist at HRI in this project. “It’s also exciting to be collaborating on technology that pushes the science frontier.”

Mechanobiology Down Under

Top: HRI visiting scholar Ms Jiexi Liao presenting; Bottom: (L-R) Professor Michael Sheetz (Mechanobiology Institute, NUS), Professor Boris Martinac (Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute), Dr Charles Cox (Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute), Dr Arnold Lining Ju (HRI).

Mechanobiology is an emerging interdisciplinary field that studies how mechanical forces regulate biological processes. This has significant implications for heart research as the cardiovascular system is globally affected by mechanical factors such as blood pressure, shear stress in blood flow and tissue mechanical properties.

Header image: Image of Australia-like platelet taken on the first super-resolution imaging platform for cardiovascular diseases in Australia. Image courtesy of Dr Peter Qian Su (IBMD, UTS) and Dr Arnold Lining Ju (Thrombosis Group, HRI).

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